“I Survived Heilsgeschichte”

Billy Bass – Horizon News Editor | @HCH_Billy

Sarah Booth celebrates her mark from her Heilsgeschichte recital on her Facebook page. "I survived Heilsgeschichte and I got a perfect score! I'm so glad that it's done and if you ever have an extra 30 minutes to an hour, call me up and I'll recite it to you." Photo: Sarah Booth, Facebook
Sarah Booth celebrates her perfect Heilsgeschichte score on her Facebook page.
“I survived Heilsgeschichte and I got a perfect score! I’m so glad that it’s done and if you ever have an extra 30 minutes to an hour, call me up and I’ll recite it to you.”
(Photo courtesy of Sarah Booth.)

For Hesston students, a perfect score on the Heilsgeschichte is something to brag about.

So that’s exactly what Sarah Booth did.

“I survived Heilsgeschichte and I got a perfect score!” a recent Facebook post reads. “I’m so glad that it’s done and if you ever have an extra 30 minutes to an hour, call me up and I’ll recite it to you.”

Booth, a freshman, is one of 87 students currently enrolled in Biblical Literature, a required course that’s now wrapping up with the Heilsgeschichte or Salvation History. “The Heils,” which students recite from start to finish, is meant to help students apply the Biblical text to their lives in meaningful ways.  

“Biblical Literature has helped me realize that I should look more in depth into my religion,” said Booth. “I went to church and Sunday school and Wednesday night youth group, but they never went as in depth as this course does.”

While not every student will be as successful as Booth, instructor Michele Hershberger says it’s not just about your final score.

“In some way, all students are successful as they do the Heilsgeschichte,” said Hershberger. “A great majority of them receive high marks, but even more important, my students make the story their own and they connect the biblical story to their own lives. Many times by the end, I’m teary-eyed.”

Future Bib Lit students can learn a lot from Booth.

“The most important thing is to keep calm if you mess up,” she said. “The professor there will help you through it. If you do mess up, it’s not a big deal, correct your mistake and keep going.”

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